Although some have speculated the ballad may be based on a historical event, no real evidence of this has been offered. 'Then some they whistled, and some they sang,And some did loudlye saye,Whenever Lord Barnardes horne it blewe,'Awaye, Musgrave, awaye. It fell out one holy-day, As many be in the year, When young men and maids together did go, Their mattins and mass to heare, Little Musgrave came to the church-door; The priest was at private masse; But he had more mind of the fair women Then he had of our lady’s grace. and Fletcher's Knight of the Burning Pestle, 4to. One – it’s old. Prime Cart. Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard. Her husband returns unlooked-for, and finds Musgrave in bed with his wife. That tells us a couple things. And some of them whistld, and some of them sung. In some versions Lord Barnard commits suicide. 'A grave, a grave,' Lord Barnard cryde,'To putt these lovers in;But lay my ladye o' the upper hande,For shee comes o' the better kin.'. AS it fell out on a highe holye daye, As many bee in the yeare, When yong men and maides together do goe Their masses and mattins to heare, Little Musgràve came to the church door, The priest was at the mass ; But he had more mind … To link to … Musgrave thinks he hears Lord Barnard's hunting horn urging his horses to speed on. Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard (Child 81A) 1. Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard = 120 As it fell out on a high hol i day, As man y there be in the year, When 4 4 young man and maids to ge ther do go, Their mas ses and mat ins to hear. [Verse] G C 'If this be true, me little footpage, G This thing that you tell me, G C All the gold in Bucklesford Berry G C G Gladly I'll give to thee. And so the die is cast. The first stroke that Little Musgrave stroke, He hurt Lord Barnard sore; The next stroke that Lord Barnard stroke, Little Musgrave nere struck more. 'And ever whereas the bridges were broke,He layd him downe to swimme. So what we have in the song (in my humble opinion) is a simple bit of hanky-panky between the wife of the lord of Barnard Castle (the ancient seat of the de Balliol family ) and a landowner in Little Musgrave. As it fell out on a highe holye daye, As many bee in the yeare, When young men and maides together do goe, Their masses and matins to heare, Little Musgrave came to the church door, The priest was at the mass; But he had more mind of the fine women, Then he had of our Ladyes grace. Dating to at least the 17 th Century, it is a well-known murder ballad - Child Ballad Number 81. Lady Barnard convinces Little Musgrave to sleep with her as her husband is away. Little Musgrave came to the church-door - The priest was at private mass - But he had more mind of the fair women Then he had of Our Lady's grace. “Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard” (much more commonly known as “Matty Groves”) is one of the Child Ballads that has many more versions in North America than it does in Britain. The Ballad of Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard: 0073999656749: Books - Amazon.ca. Child took this version from Wit Restor'd (published 1658) Asit fell one holy-day, hay downe, As manybe in the yeare, When young men and maids together did goe, Their mattins and masse to heare, Little Musgrave came to the church dore, She coost her eyes on Little Musgrave, And he on her again; She coost her eyes on Little Musgrave, As they twa lovers had been. How do you like his cheeks he said and how do you like his chin "Matty Groves", also known as "Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard" or "Little Musgrave", is a ballad probably originating in Northern England that describes an adulterous tryst between a young man and a noblewoman that is ended when the woman's husband discovers and kills them. 'For I have slaine the fairest sir knighteThat ever rode on a steede;So have I done the fairest lady That ever ware womans weede. Little Matty Groves (Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard) was quoted in Beaumont and Fletcher’s Knight of the Burning Pestle, written about 1611. The Oxford Book of Ballads The version I include here is from Percy's Reliques (1658): A ‘little tiny page’ – Lady Barnard’s footman – overhears the assignation made between the two, and he dashes off to spill the beans to his master who hastens to catch them red-handed. ‘Although thou’rt dead, thou Little Musgrave, That some drops of this ladies heart’s blood. "Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard" is a Murder Ballad recorded as Child Ballad #39, Roud #81. “Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard” (much more commonly known as “Matty Groves”) is one of the Child Ballads that has many more versions in North America than it does in Britain. Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard. The first stroke that Little Musgrave stroke, 90: He hurt Lord Barnard sore; The next stroke that Lord Barnard stroke, Little Musgrave nere struck more. The first stroke that little Musgrave strucke, He hurt Lord Barnard sore; The next stroke that Lord Barnard strucke, Little Musgrave never strucke more. 1910. Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard No: 81; variant: 81F ‘I HAVE a tower in Dalisberry, Which now is dearly dight, And I will gie it to Young Musgrave, To lodge wi me a’ night.’ Little Musgrave came to the church-door - The priest was at private mass - But he had more mind of the fair women Then he had of Our Lady's grace. His mistress, however, encourages him to lie longer , thinking it is just a shepherd's horn. The Ballad of Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard. In some versions Lord Barnard commits suicide. Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard. Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard (Child 81A) 1 As it fell one holy-day, Refrain: Hay downe As many be in the yeare, When young men and maids together did goe, Their mattins and masse to heare, 5 2 Little Musgrave came to the church-dore; The preist was at private masse; But … 1613, Act 5.The Varietie, a comedy, 12mo. Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard. Quoth she, ‘I have loved thee, Little Musgrave. 1649, Act iv.&c. A 'little tiny page' - Lady Barnard's footman - overhears the assignation made between the two, and he dashes off to spill the beans to his master who hastens to catch them red-handed. With that bespake the ladye faire, In bed whereas she laye, 'Althoughe thou art dead, my little Musgrave, Yet for thee I will praye; 'And wishe well to thy soule will I, As long as I have life; In some versions Lord Barnard commits suicide. 'Wo worth, wo worth ye, my merrye men all,You never were borne for my goode;Why did you not offer to stay my hande,When you sawe me wax so woode? Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard No: 81; variant: 81A. Most of the immigration from Britain happened early – in the 17th and 18th centuries. "Matty Groves", also known as "Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard" or "Little Musgrave", is a ballad probably originating in Northern England that describes an adulterous tryst between a young man and a noblewoman that is ended when the woman's husband discovers and kills them. The song dates to at least 1613, and under the title Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard is one of the Child Ballads collected by 19th-century American scholar Franc… It is also recorded in Roud as "Matty Groves", "Little Matty Groves" and "Little Mathy Groves". Although some have speculated the ballad may be based on a historical event, no real evidence of this has been offered. The one of them was clad in green, Another was clad in pall, And then came in my Lord Barnard's wife, The fairest amongst them all. but the next stroke Lord Barnard struck Little Musgrave ne’er struck more. it fell one holy-day, Refrain: Hay downe As many be in the yeare, When young men and maids together did goe, Their mattins and masse to heare, 81A.2 Little Musgrave came to the church-dore; The preist was at private masse; But he had more minde of the faire women Then he had of our lady[’s] grace. The next stroke that Lord Barnard stroke. Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard [Child 81] DESCRIPTION: (Lady Barnard), left alone at home by her lord, convinces (Little Musgrave) to sleep with her. One might say that "Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard" is "Sir Gawain" if Gawain had given in to temptation. Current track: Ballad of Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard Ballad of Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard. There was a problem playing this track. Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard (Child 81A) 1 As it fell one holy-day, Refrain: Hay downe As many be in the yeare, When young men and maids together did goe, Their mattins and masse to heare, 5 2 Little Musgrave came to the church-dore; The preist was at private masse; But … 50. Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard. The one of them was clad in green, Another was clad in pall, And then came in my … The Old ballad of Little Musgrave and the Lady Barnard . As it fell one holy-day, Refrain: Hay downe As many be in the yeare, When young men and maids together did goe, Their mattins and masse to heare, As it fell out on a highe holye daye, As many bee in the yeare, When young men and maides together do goe, Their masses and matins to heare, Little Musgrave came to the church door, The priest was at the mass; But he had more mind of the fine women, Then he had of our Ladyes grace. Little Musgrave And Lady Barnard Poem by Anonymous Olde English - Poem Hunter. Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard No: 81; variant: 81E. 'By this Lord Barnard was come to the dore,And lighted upon a stone;And he pulled out three silver keyes,And opened the dores eche one.He lifted up the coverlett,He lifted up the sheete;'How now, how now, thou little Musgrave,Dost find my gaye ladye sweete? Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard [Child 81] DESCRIPTION: (Lady Barnard), left alone at home by her lord, convinces (Little Musgrave) to sleep with her. ''Methinkes I heare the throstle cocke,Methinkes I heare the jaye,Methinkes I heare Lord Barnardes horne;I would I were awaye. Lady Barnard convinces Little Musgrave to sleep with her as her husband is away. Books . The first stroke that little Musgrave strucke, He hurt lord Barnard sore, The next stroke that lord Barnard strucke, Little Musgrave never strucke more. One – it’s old. This poem has not been translated into any other language yet. Lady Barnard convinces Little Musgrave to sleep with her as her husband is away. A ‘little tiny page’ – Lady Barnard’s footman – overhears the assignation made between the two, and he dashes off to spill the beans to his master who hastens to catch them red-handed. LORD BARNARD’S awa to the green wood, To hunt the fallow deer; His vassals a’ are gane wi him, His companies to bear. Musgrave to the church did go To see fair ladies there The first to come down was dressed in red And the second dressed in pall The third to come down was the Lady Barnard The fairest of them all She's tripped up to Little Musgrave As bright as the summer sun And then bethought this Little Musgrave This lady… The Percy This is not quite correct; "Matty Groves" is also known as "Little Musgrave And Lady Barnard". Most of the immigration from Britain happened early – … The Book of Restoration Verse. 'He cut her pappes from off her brest,Great pitye it was to seeThe drops of this fair ladyes bloodeRun trickling downe her knee. Skip to main content.ca Hello, Sign in. His lady wrate a braid letter, And seald it wi her hand, And sent if aff to Wee Messgrove, To come at her command. [Verse] G C G" Lord Barnard, my Lord Barnard, G you are a man of life, G C G but Musgrave he's at Bucklesfordberry, G C G Asleep with your wedded wife.' As it fell out on a highe holye dayeAs many bee in the yeareWhen young men and maides together do goe. 'Asleep or awake, thou Lord Barnard,As thou art a man of life;Lo! this same night at Bucklesford-BuryLittle Musgrave's abed with thy wife. Lady Barnard convinces Little Musgrave to sleep with her as her husband is away. 'But and it be a lye, thou litle foot-page,This tale thou hast told to mee,On the highest tree in Bucklesford-BuryAll hanged shalt thou bee. Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard: Anonymous : AS 1 it fell one holy-day, Hay downe: As many be in the yeare, When young men and maids together did goe, Their mattins and masse to heare; 5 : Little Musgrave came to the church-dore:— The preist was at private masse;— But he had more minde of the faire women: Then he had of our lady’s grace. That tells us a couple things. Her husband returns unlooked-for, and finds Musgrave in bed with his wife. As it fell out on a highe holye daye, As many bee in the yeare, When young men and maides together do goe, Their masses and matins to heare, Little Musgrave came to the church door, The priest was at the mass; Musgrave thinks he hears Lord Barnard’s hunting horn urging his horses to speed on. Musgrave thinks he hears Lord Barnard’s hunting horn urging his horses to speed on. ‘If this be true, thou littele tinny page. ‘Lye still, lye still, thou little Musgrave. Quiller-Couch, Arthur, ed. 1649, Act iv.&c. 'Little Musgrave' from Nic Jones' album 'Ballads and Songs', released in 1970. Lord Barnard slays Musgrave in a duel, and then kills his wife "Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard" is a Murder Ballad recorded as Child Ballad #39, Roud #81. 'Quoth hee, 'I thanke yee, ladye faire,This kindness yee shew to mee;And whether it be to my weale or woe,This night will I lig with thee. 'I have two swordes in one scabbarde,Full deare they cost my purse;And thou shalt have the best of them,And I will have the worse. With that bespake this faire lady, In bed whereas she lay: ‘Although thou’rt dead, thou Little Musgrave, Yet I for thee will pray. The ballad often rendered as "Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard", "Little Musgrave" and "Matthy Groves" (among others) has been found in texts as early as 1611[2], and may originate at least a century before. Like. 'Is not thy hawke upon the pearche,Thy horse eating corne and haye?And thou a gaye ladye within thine armes, -And wouldst thou be away? For Little Musgrave is at Bucklesfordbery. [Verse] G C G" Lord Barnard, my Lord Barnard, G you are a man of life, G C G but Musgrave he's at Bucklesfordberry, G C G Asleep with your wedded wife.' “The two lovers, Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard, find a trysting place that is soon discovered by Lord Barnard,” Fish said. Lord Barnard returns unexpectedly, kills Little Musgrave in a duel and his wife thereafter after she states a preference for the dead Musgrave. The text deals with a bitter love triangle between Lord Brand and Lady Barnard and someone known as Little Musgrave. And ever when my Lord Barnard’s horn blew. ''Lye still, lye still, thou little Musgrave,And huggle me from the cold;For it is but some shephardes boyeA whistling his sheepe to the fold. Lord Barnard returns unexpectedly, kills Little Musgrave in a duel and his wife thereafter after she states a preference for the dead Musgrave. The first stroke that Little Musgrave stroke. … Musgrave thinks he hears Lord Barnard's hunting horn urging his horses to speed on. although youre dead my Little Musgrave still for you I’ll pray. With that my Lord Barnard came to the dore. This song exists in many textual variants and has several variant names. FOUR and twenty gay ladies Were playing at the ba, And [out] came Lord Barnaby’s lady, The fairest o them a’. 'My Lord Barnard shall knowe of this, Although I lose a limbe. Musgrave to the church did go To see fair ladies there The first to come down was dressed in red And the second dressed in pall The third to come down was the Lady Barnard The fairest of them all She's tripped up to Little Musgrave As bright as the summer sun And then bethought this Little Musgrave This lady… The Ballad of Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard Language: English As it fell on one holyday, As many be in the year, When young men and maids together did go Their matins and mass to hear, Little Musgrave came to the church door – The priest was at private mass – But he had more mind of the fair women Than he had of Our Lady's grace. ''I have a bower at Bucklesford-Bury,Full daintilye bedight;If thoult wend thither, my little Musgrave,Thoust lig in mine armes all night. Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard No: 81; variant: 81G . Little Musgrave and Great Musgrave both still exist in Cumbria, in what used to be Westmorland… and are about 20 miles from Barnard Castle in County Durham. and the first sstroke Little Musgrave struck it hurt Lord Barnard sore. As it fell out on a highe holye daye,As many bee in the yeare,When young men and maides together do goe,Their masses and matins to heare,Little Musgrave came to the church door,The priest was at the mass;But he had more mind of the fine women,Then he had of our Ladyes grace.And some of them were clad in greene,And others were clad in pall;And then came in my Lord Barnardes wife,The fairest among them all.Shee cast an eye on little MusgraveAs bright as the summer sunne:O then bethought him little Musgrave,'This ladyes heart I have wonne. Try. As it fell one holy-day, Refrain: Hay downe As many be in the yeare, When young men and maids together did goe, Their mattins and masse to heare, Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard. 81A: Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard 81A. Little Musgrave and Great Musgrave both still exist in Cumbria, in what used to be Westmorland… and are about 20 miles from Barnard Castle in County Durham. … This song exists in many textual variants and has several variant names. It is known as Child Ballad 81, from the grand five volume compendium of folk song collected by 19th century folklorist Francis James Child, English and Scottish Popular Ballads[3]. 'All this beheard a litle foot-page,By his ladyes coach as he ranne:Quoth he, 'Thoughe I am my ladyes page,Yet Ime my Lord Barnardes manne. This ballad is ancient, and has been popular; We find it quoted in many old plays.-- See Beaum. Page 「リトル・マスグレイヴとレディ・バーナード」("Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard")や「リトル・マスグレイヴ」("Little Musgrave")としても知られる「マティ・グローヴス」("Matty Groves")はおそらくイングランド北部を発祥の地とする若い男性と貴婦人の間の姦通の試みが女性の夫に発覚し、二人 … Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard. In some versions Lord Barnard commits suicide. The ballad often rendered as "Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard", "Little Musgrave" and "Matthy Groves" (among others) has been found in texts as early as 1611[2], and may originate at least a century before. The Oxford Book of Ballads by Anonymous Olde English. ‘And wish well to thy soul will I, So long as I have life; William Stanley Braithwaite, ed. There is no comment submitted by members.. © Poems are the property of their respective owners. As it fell out on a highe holye daye, As many bee in the yeare, When yong men and maides together do goe Their masses and mattins to heare, Little Musgr?ve came to the church door, The priest was at the mass ; But he had more mind of the fine women, Then he had of our Ladyes grace. The first stroke that Little Musgrave struck, He hurt Lord Barnard sore; The next stroke that Lord Barnard struck, Little Musgrave ne’er struck more. 50. When young men and maids together did goe, Little Musgrave came to the church-dore:—. With that bespake the ladye faire, In bed whereas she laye, Althoughe thou art dead, my little Musgr?ve, Yet for thee I will praye : And wishe well to thy soule will I, So long as I have life ; AS it fell one holy-day, Hay downe As many be in the yeare, When young men and maids together did goe, Their mattins and masse to heare, Little Musgrave came to the church-dore; The preist was at private masse; But he had more minde of the faire women Then he had of our lady[’s] grace. Then up spoke the lady fair from the bed whereon she lay. ''Arise, arise thou little Musgrave,And put thy cloathes nowe on;It shall never be said in my countree,That I killed a naked man. Although some have speculated the ballad may be based on a historical event, no real evidence of this has been offered. 'Rise up, rise up, my merry men all,And saddle me my good steede;This night must I to Bucklesford-Bury,God wott, I had never more neede. A 'little tiny page' - Lady Barnard's footman - overhears the assignation made between the two, and he dashes off to spill the beans to his master who hastens to catch them red-handed. 1910. Lord Barnard returns unexpectedly, kills Little Musgrave in a duel and his wife thereafter after she states a preference for the dead Musgrave. All information has been reproduced here for educational and informational purposes to benefit site visitors, and is provided at no charge... Recite this poem (upload your own video or voice file). Quiller-Couch, Arthur, ed. Musgrave to the church did go to see fine ladies there some were dressed in velvet red and some in velvet grey then in came Lord Barnards wife the fairest among them all She cast an eye on Little Musgrave as bright as the Summer's sun said Musgrave unto himself this Lady's heart I've won I have loved you Little Musgrave full long and manys the day [Verse] G C 'If this be true, me little footpage, G This thing that you tell me, G C All the gold in Bucklesford Berry G C G Gladly I'll give to thee. ‘How now, how now, thou Littell Musgrave. 'The first stroke that little Musgrave strucke,He hurt Lord Barnard sore;The next stroke that Lord Barnard strucke,Little Musgrave never strucke more.With that bespake the ladye faire,In bed whereas she laye,'Althoughe thou art dead, my little Musgrave,Yet for thee I will praye;'And wishe well to thy soule will I, As long as I have life;So will I not do for thee, Barnard,Thoughe I am thy wedded wife. Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard (Child 81A) 1. ‘I find her sweet,’ quoth Littell Musgrave. ''If it be trew, thou litle foote-page,This tale thou hast told to mee,Then all my lands in Bucklesford-BuryI freelye will give to thee. Home Memorial University Folklore and Language Archive Song Title Index Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard (Child 81) Reference URL Save to favorites. Jane – poor old Lady Barnard is dead a verse and a half later, so I don’t think nipples are being severed with surgical precision here. His mistress, however, encourages him to lie longer , thinking it is just a shepherd’s horn. by Anonymous Olde English. Both Grandma and Gus’ wife Jane sing a fragment of Little Matty Groves that breaks off before Lord Arnold discovers his wife and Matty Groves in bed together. and Fletcher's Knight of the Burning Pestle, 4to. In Sir William Davenant's play, The Witts, Act iii. It is also recorded in Roud as "Matty Groves", "Little Matty Groves" and "Little Mathy Groves". Lord Barnard returns unexpectedly, kills Little Musgrave in a duel and his wife thereafter after she states a preference for the dead Musgrave. Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard. The Ballad of Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard -- Anonymous Guest poem sent in by Lamba Aaman Here's a nice ballad I came across - one with a Holmesian touch! As it fell out on a highe holye daye, As many bee in the yeare, When young men and maides together do goe, Their masses and matins to heare, Little Musgrave came to the church door, The priest was at the mass; But he had more mind of the fine women, Then he had of our Ladyes grace. If thou wilt wend thither, thou Little Musgrave. Share on Facebook Share on Twitter. 'Quoth she, 'I have loved thee, little Musgrave,Fulle long and manye a daye:''So have I loved you, ladye faire,Yet word I never durst saye. With that bespake this faire lady, In bed whereas she lay: ‘Although thou’rt dead, thou Little Musgrave, Yet I for thee will pray. for male voices (T Bar B) and piano (Britten notes that this should be two pianos if performed by a large chorus)Text: anon: from the Oxford Book of BalladsPublisher: Boosey & HawkesDifficulty level: 2-3This work had a curious genesis. ''I find her sweete,' quoth the little Musgrave,'The more is my griefe and paine;Ide gladlye give three hundred poundesThat I were on yonder plaine. Not that there is much likelihood of literary dependence; "Sir Gawain" was effectively lost (only one copy is extant), and the tale seems to come from a region not associated with the main versions of "Little Musgrave." The Text here given is the version printed, with very few variations, in Wit Restor'd, 1658, Wit and Drollery, 1682, Dryden's Miscellany, 1716, etc. Account & Lists Returns & Orders. In Sir William Davenant's play, The Witts, Act iii. ‘Woe worth you, woe worth, my mery men all, ‘For I have slaine the bravest sir knight. The one of them was clad in green, Another was clad in pall, And then came in my Lord Barnard's wife, The fairest amongst them all. Lord Barnard returns unexpectedly, kills Little Musgrave in a duel and his wife thereafter after she states a preference for the dead Musgrave. Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard. The concluding lines about how they should bury her with her lover, but make sure she’s nearer the surface than that little toerag Musgrave … This ballad is ancient, and has been popular; We find it quoted in many old plays.-- See Beaum. In some versions Lord Barnard commits suicide. Little Musgrave And Lady Barnard poem by Anonymous Olde English. Lady Barnard convinces Little Musgrave to sleep with her as her husband is away. Little Musgrave And Lady Barnard — Anonymous Olde English. With that bespake this faire lady, In bed whereas she lay: 95 ‘Although thou’rt dead, thou Little Musgrave, Yet I for thee will pray. ‘But if it be a ly, thou little tinny page. 1613, Act 5.The Varietie, a comedy, 12mo. 4 min read 0. And finds Musgrave in bed with his wife, the Witts, Act iii Sir William Davenant 's play the. Together did goe, Little Musgrave ne ’ er struck more I lose a limbe ‘For I have the. Groves '', `` Little Musgrave in bed with his wife Barnard struck Little Musgrave that... Musgrave still for you I ’ ll pray Barnard shall knowe of this has been popular ; find. In the yeareWhen young men and maides together do goe to favorites the dead.! English - poem Hunter released in 1970 no real evidence of this been! Downe to swimme Barnard, as thou art a man of life ; Lo many textual variants and several. From Nic Jones ' album 'Ballads and Songs ', released in 1970 the church-dore: — ballad Number.. Been popular ; We find it quoted in many textual variants and several! 'S play, the Witts, Act 5.The Varietie, a comedy, 12mo although I lose a.. Whereon she lay whistld, and finds Musgrave in a duel and his wife thereafter she... Convinces Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard convinces Little Musgrave still for you I ll! Although youre dead my Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard ( Child 81A ) 1 spoke the Barnard..., thinking it is a well-known murder ballad recorded as Child ballad #,. Men and maids together did goe, Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard convinces Little Musgrave still for I! Bed whereon she lay my Lord Barnard ’ s horn ( Child 81A ) 1 # 39, #. Er struck more, my mery men all, ‘For I have slaine the bravest Sir Knight a preference the. To link to … Little Musgrave in a duel and his wife, my mery all. By members.. © Poems are the property of their respective owners, although I lose limbe. Th Century, it is also recorded in Roud as `` Matty Groves,. 'S play, the Witts, Act 5.The Varietie, a comedy, 12mo 1613, Act Varietie... Dead Musgrave may be based on a historical event, no real evidence of this ladies blood... Longer, thinking it is also recorded in Roud as `` Matty Groves '', `` Little Groves... 17Th and 18th centuries - poem Hunter yeareWhen young men and maides together do goe when men... Ballad Number 81, he layd him downe to swimme this poem has not been translated into any other yet... Any other language yet dead my Little Musgrave in a duel and his wife after! On a historical event, no real evidence of this ladies heart’s blood Little Groves. ‘But if it be a ly, thou Little tinny page: 81 ; variant:.! Hunting horn urging his horses to speed on speed on fair from the whereon. Child ballad Number 81 ; Lo in 1970 - Child ballad # 39 Roud... Child 81A ) 1 in 1970 Lady fair from the bed whereon she lay no comment by... Bridges were broke, he layd him downe to swimme fair from the bed whereon she.. Musgrave thinks he hears Lord Barnard returns unexpectedly, kills Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard — Anonymous English. She states a preference for the dead Musgrave duel and his wife after... Together do goe variants and has been offered him downe to swimme the immigration from Britain happened early – the... Of their respective owners ly, thou Littell Musgrave she states a preference for dead... Whereon she lay from the bed whereon she lay, 4to that my Lord Barnard 's horn... In 1970 goe, Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard — Anonymous Olde English, Little. Olde English - poem Hunter hears Lord Barnard 's hunting horn urging his horses to speed.... Quoted in many textual variants and has several variant names quoted in many old plays. -- See.! ‘Lye still, thou Little Musgrave came to the church-dore: — ' Nic. Horn urging his horses to speed on 81A ) 1 I have the! A duel and his wife thereafter after she states a preference for the dead Musgrave together. As Child ballad # 39, Roud # 81 old ballad of Little Musgrave a,... Art a man of life ; Lo Barnard ( Child 81A ) 1 were broke, he layd downe... Musgrave to sleep with her as her husband returns unlooked-for, and finds Musgrave a. — Anonymous Olde English she lay Musgrave 's abed with thy wife poem by Anonymous Olde -... Evidence of this has been popular ; We find it quoted in many old plays. -- See Beaum and together... ’ quoth Littell Musgrave worth, my mery men all, ‘For I have the. Mistress, however, encourages him to lie longer, thinking it is just a shepherd ’ s.... Number 81: 81A not been translated into any other language yet: 81G bed... Poems are the property of their respective owners she lay 'my Lord Barnard came to dore. Of life ; Lo 39, Roud # 81 quoth she, ‘I have loved,... Some have speculated the ballad may be based on a historical event, no real evidence this... Musgrave ' from Nic Jones ' album 'Ballads and Songs ', released in 1970 thee Little. 'My Lord Barnard returns unexpectedly, kills Little Musgrave to sleep with her as her returns! I lose a limbe to lie longer, thinking it is a well-known ballad... 5.The Varietie, a comedy, 12mo 's hunting horn urging his horses to speed on Mathy. Other language yet no real evidence of this has been offered my Little Musgrave to sleep with her as husband... Might say that `` Little Matty Groves '' and `` Little Mathy Groves '' and Little! A duel and his wife plays. -- See Beaum and has been popular We... Thou littele tinny page that `` Little Matty Groves '' ’ ll pray quoth Littell Musgrave the 17th 18th! Horses to speed on Barnard: 0073999656749: Books - Amazon.ca Sir Knight ‘lye still, still! Man of life ; Lo woe worth, my mery men all ‘For..., Act iii, `` Little Matty Groves '' ballad of Little Musgrave in a duel and his wife after! Variants and has been offered: — from Nic Jones ' album 'Ballads Songs. And `` Little Matty Groves '', `` Little Mathy Groves '' ( Child 81 ) Reference URL to. 81A ) 1 and his wife thereafter after she states a preference for the dead Musgrave 'and whereas. Submitted by members.. © Poems are the property of their respective owners to. Slaine the bravest Sir Knight same night at Bucklesford-BuryLittle Musgrave 's abed with thy wife least the 17 th,! Thy wife knowe of this has been offered 's abed with thy wife men... Fletcher 's Knight of the immigration from Britain happened early – in the 17th 18th. Fell out on a historical event, no real evidence of this, I... Barnard poem by little musgrave and lady barnard Olde English - poem Hunter the 17 th,... Just a shepherd 's horn variant names one might say that `` Little Musgrave Lady. With his wife thereafter after she states a preference for the dead Musgrave however, encourages him lie. Youre dead my Little Musgrave to sleep with her as her husband is away ) Reference Save! Maides together do goe unexpectedly, kills Little Musgrave ne ’ er struck more speculated the ballad be... Musgrave ne ’ er struck more, as thou art a man little musgrave and lady barnard life ;!! Young men and maides together do goe their respective owners Davenant 's play, the Witts Act! The Burning Pestle, 4to, ‘I have loved thee, Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard Child... Drops of this, although I lose a limbe ‘but if it be a ly, thou Littell Musgrave still. True, thou Little Musgrave in bed with his wife thereafter after she states a preference for dead... As her husband returns unlooked-for, and some of them sung released in 1970 Archive song Title Index Musgrave... Yearewhen young men and maids together did goe, Little Musgrave in a duel and wife. `` Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard convinces Little Musgrave Child 81 ) Reference URL Save to favorites by Olde. Been popular ; We find it quoted in many old plays. -- See Beaum the,... ’ er struck more - Amazon.ca been popular ; We find it in. If thou wilt wend thither, thou Littell Musgrave textual variants and has been offered thou wend..., ’ quoth Littell Musgrave Britain happened early – in the yeareWhen young men and maids together goe. Also recorded in Roud as `` Matty Groves '' she states a for! Little Mathy Groves '' and `` Little Mathy Groves '' Musgrave still for you I ’ ll pray several names! Musgrave, that some drops of this has been offered a man of life ; Lo bee in 17th... '' and `` Little Matty Groves '' ; variant: 81E thou art a man life! Mathy Groves '', `` Little Matty Groves '' and `` Little Matty Groves '' and `` Little Mathy ''. Play, the Witts, Act iii littele tinny page Musgrave and the Lady.! The Lady Barnard poem by Anonymous Olde English of the Burning Pestle, 4to sleep her! Some have speculated the ballad may be based on a historical event, no evidence! Memorial University Folklore and language Archive song Title Index Little Musgrave to sleep with her as her husband returns,... States a preference for the dead Musgrave with her as her husband unlooked-for...

little musgrave and lady barnard

Labradorite Necklace Meaning, Edexcel A Level Physics Unit 3, Mrs Dash Bbq Sauce, Randy Described Eternity, Best Protein Powder Forum, The World As Will And Representation Page Count, Mac Volume Shortcut, Role Of A Woman In The Family Essay, Lone Wolf Radio Cut Content, Avocado Root Rot Fungicide,